Penarth Dock, South Wales - 150 years - the heritage and legacy  
Penarth Dock, South Wales - the heritage & legacy . . .

Index to Volume Seven - The People - Dock Family Trees - Railway and Dock Company Officials . . .

George Fisher - (1809-1891)

DEATH OF MR GEO. FISHER, OF THE TAFF VALE RAILWAY. It is with profoundest regret we record the death of Mr. George Fisher, deputy-chairman of the Taff Vale Railway Company, the sad event taking place about eight o'clock on Sunday evening at Mr. Fisher's residence at Radyr. The deceased gentleman, than whom no one was more respected - not only in South Wales and the West of England, but in much wider circles - had reached the advanced age of 82, and had been in fairly good health up to within the last few weeks. He was able, however, to attend a meeting of the Taff Vale board on Thursday week, but was then suffering from a cold which had kept, him within doors for a month or five weeks. He then took a fresh cold, but was again able to come to Cardiff on Tuesday last. On his return home he seemed a little worse and remained in the house. Nothing serious, however, was apprehended, and no dangerous symptoms manifested themselves until Saturday morning when congestion of the lungs showed itself. Dr. Fred Evans was at once called in, but Mr. Fisher's age told against him, and so severe was the attack that Dr. Evans at once saw the case was well-nigh helpless. On Sunday morning Mr. Fisher was very much worse, and, at the request of the friends, Dr. Hardyman was called in, but medical skill was of no avail, and Mr. Fisher rapidly sank, retaining consciousness to the last, and dying at the time above stated. There were then with him Mrs. George Fisher, Mr. H. 0. Fisher (his son), Mrs. Lorange, and Mrs. A. Ware (two married daughters), and the Misses Fisher. The deceased gentleman was probably the oldest person connected with the Taff Vale Railway Company, having been in connection with it over 50 years, or almost from its very commencement. He had long enjoyed the unbounded confidence of the shareholders of the company, and at the time of his death was resident director and deputy-chairman. His practical mind and wide experience gave him great influence in the affairs of the company, and when a few years ago, a proposal was made that the Taff Vale Company should purchase the Bute Docks his objection to the scheme had undoubtedly great weight. He rarely spoke at the shareholders' meetings, but, on the other hand, his voice had great weight. Mr. Fisher for many years resided at Bute Villa, Newport-road, Cardiff, but about eight years ago removed to Radyr to a residence he had built overlooking the line whose good fortunes he had had such a large share in building. His son. Mr. H. O. Fisher, is the present engineer of the company. - Evening Express [135] [361] 4th May 1891

 
The historian and author Mr Colin Chapman wrote the following Biography of George Fisher CE 1809-1891 which is held at the archives of the WRRC Welsh Railways Research Circle. [778] [737] [WRRC Resource No. TV120]
The management of the Taff Vale Railway over almost all of its independent existence was dominated by two powerful individuals. The first, George Fisher, occupied various positions of authority from the opening of the TVR through to Merthyr in 1841 until his death in May 1891. The second, Ammon Beasley, was appointed General Manager of the company on 29 June 1891 and achieved national fame (or notoriety depending on your political point of view), before retiring from that post in 1917, aged 80. Despite his many achievements George Fisher is much less well known than his successor and his contemporaries Cornelius Lundie of the Rhymney and Joshua Williams of the Vale of Neath and GWR, but then unlike the last pair he did not have the advantage of a silly name. The management of the Taff Vale Railway over almost all of its independent existence was dominated by two powerful individuals. The first, George Fisher, occupied various positions of authority from the opening of the TVR through to Merthyr in 1841 until his death in May 1891. The second, Ammon Beasley, was appointed General Manager of the company on 29 June 1891 and achieved national fame (or notoriety depending on your political point of view), before retiring from that post in 1917, aged 80. Despite his many achievements George Fisher is much less well known than his successor and his contemporaries Cornelius Lundie of the Rhymney and Joshua Williams of the Vale of Neath and GWR, but then unlike the last pair he did not have the advantage of a silly name.
 
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